Articles Cookbook

Tag: Join

Converting Subqueries to Joins

Not all queries are alike, especially in terms of performance. In this article, we'll look at how you can convert SQL subqueries to joins for improved efficiency. When should I use SQL subqueries? Great question! Unfortunately, there's no concrete answer. SQL beginners tend to overuse subqueries. Typically, once they find that SQL construction works in one situation, they try to apply that same approach to other situations. It's only natural.

SQL Hacks To Control Family Budget On Black Friday Weekend

If you’re in the US, chances are you’ve been eagerly awaiting the approach of Black Friday just as much as Thanksgiving. Though the shopping frenzy takes hold of nearly everyone, some people have to stick to their budgets and shop prudently. In this article, we’ll take a look at how generating an SQL report can help you track how much your family spent shopping on Black Friday. Storing Black Friday Purchases in a Database Before we can create an SQL report, we first need some data we can use.

An Illustrated Guide to Multiple Join

So far, our articles in the "An Illustrated Guide" series have explained several join types: INNER JOINs, OUTER JOINs (LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN, FULL JOIN), CROSS JOIN, self-join and non-equi join. In this final article of the series, we show you how to create SQL queries that match data from multiple tables using one or more join types. -- Join Types in SQL Queries Before we start discussing example SQL queries that use multiple join types, let's do a short recap of the join types we've covered so far, just to be sure you understand the differences.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL Non Equi Join

Did you know that in SQL, a join doesn’t have to be based on identical matches? In this post, we look at the SQL non equi join, which uses ‘non-equal’ operators to match records. -- We’ve already discussed several types of joins, including self joins and CROSS JOIN, INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN. These types of joins typically appear with the equals sign (=). However, some joins use conditions other than the equals (=) sign.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL Self Join

What is an SQL self join and how does it work? When should it be used? We’ll provide answers to those questions! -- In SQL, we can combine data from multiple tables by using a JOIN operator. JOIN has several variants; we’ve already discussed CROSS JOIN, INNER JOIN, and OUTER JOIN. Most of the time, these operators join data from two or more different tables. You can practice all the different types of JOINs in our interactive SQL JOINs course.

How to Track Down Duplicate Values in a Table

When it comes to information management, duplicates present one of the most common challenges to data quality. In this article, I'll explain how it is possible to find and distinguish duplicate names with the help of the SQL data programming language. I really like my maiden name. The reason I like it so much is because it's rare. My maiden name (first with last) provided a unique identifier on platforms such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and similar.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL OUTER JOIN

We’ve already discussed the SQL CROSS JOIN and INNER JOIN statements. It’s time to explore another: OUTER JOIN. What is it? How does it work? Let’s find out! -- If you’ve read our other posts, you know that you can link the data in two or more database tables using one of the many types of SQL join operator. Today, we’ll discuss the three kinds of OUTER JOIN: LEFT OUTER JOIN, RIGHT OUTER JOIN, and FULL OUTER JOIN.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL INNER JOIN

What is an SQL INNER JOIN, and how does it work? Let's find out! In my last article, I discussed the CROSS JOIN operation in SQL. Today, we'll look at INNER JOIN and how to use it. Is it the same as a JOIN? How many tables can you link with an INNER JOIN? These are all good questions. Let's look at the answers! What is an INNER JOIN? INNER JOIN combines data from multiple tables by joining them based on a matching record.

An Illustrated Guide to the SQL CROSS JOIN

What is an SQL CROSS JOIN statement? When should you use it? When shouldn't you use it? This post will tell you what you need to know about CROSS JOIN. -- You already know that you can use the SQL JOIN statement to join one or more tables that share a matching record. And if you're read the LearnSQL's post Learning SQL JOINs Using Real Life Situations, you know that there are many types of JOINs.

An Introduction to Using SQL Aggregate Functions with JOINs

-- Previously, we've discussed the use of SQL aggregate functions with the GROUP BY statement. Regular readers of the our blog will also remember our recent tutorial about JOINs. If you're a bit rusty on either subject, I encourage you to review them before continuing this article. That's because we will dig further into aggregate functions by pairing them with JOINs. This duo unleashes the full possibilities of SQL aggregate functions and allows us to perform computations on multiple tables in a single query.

Learning JOINs With Real World SQL Examples

-- The JOIN statement lets you work with data stored in multiple tables. In this article, I’ll walk you through the topic of JOIN clauses using real world SQL examples. -- Imagine if you could only work with one database table at a time. Fortunately, this isn’t anything we have to worry about. Once you learn the JOIN statement, you can start linking data together.

SQL JOINs for Beginners

You’re probably already familiar with simple SQL queries, such as “SELECT * FROM table”. Now you are wondering what to do when you have multiple tables, and you want to join them. Exactly! JOIN is the key. In this SQL JOINs tutorial for beginners, you will learn how to connect data from multiple tables. What are SQL JOINs? Databases usually have more than one table. JOINs are an SQL construction used to join data from two or more tables.